EVOCATIVE OBJECTS SHERRY TURKLE PDF

Buy Evocative Objects: Things We Think With (The MIT Press) Reprint by Sherry Turkle (ISBN: ) from Amazon’s Book Store. Everyday low prices. We tend to view objects as either mundane, workaday items – tools – or as things of beauty, say a vase or a sculpture. But for Turkle, a. Evocative Objects. Things We Think With edited by Sherry Turkle. The MIT Press Cambridge, Massachusetts. London, England.

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For Sherry Turkle, “We think with the objects we love; we love the objects we think with.

These essays reveal objects as emotional and intellectual companions that anchor memory, sustain relationships, and provoke new ideas.

These days, For Sherry Turkle, “We think with the objects we love; we love the objects we think with. These days, scholars show new interest in the importance of the concrete. This volume’s special contribution is its focus on everyday riches: The poet contends, “No ideas but in things. In our relations to things, thought and feeling are inseparable.

Whether it’s a student’s beloved Ford Falcon left behind for a station wagon and motherhoodor a cello that inspires a meditation on fatherhood, the intimate objects in this collection are used to reflect on larger themes–the role of objects in design and play, discipline and desire, history and exchange, mourning and memory, transition and passage, meditation and new vision. In the interest of enriching these connections, Turkle pairs each autobiographical essay with a text from philosophy, history, literature, or theory, creating juxtapositions at once playful and profound.

Each essay is framed by images that are themselves evocative. Essays by Turkle begin and utrkle the collection, inviting us to look more closely at the everyday objects of our lives, the familiar objects that drive our routines, hold our affections, and open out our world in unexpected ways.

Hardcoverpages. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Evocative Objectsplease sign up. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Dec 05, Elizabeth rated it liked object Shelves: This book is one of a number recently published, all of which justify themselves as providing needed voices for material objects in our culture.

In a way, it makes good sense that this type of analysis was ignored by scholars so often. In an academic climate where technological determinism is practically taboo, scholarship turned away from object-specific histories.

Evocative Objects edited by Sherry Turkle – review

However, as Turkle’s collection both shows and tells, it did so at the expense of fully illuminating the vast meanings objects evok This book is one of a number recently published, all of which justify themselves as providing needed voices for material objects in our culture. However, as Turkle’s collection both shows and tells, it did so at the expense of fully illuminating the vast meanings objects evoke for users and scholars alike.

I like how this book manages to be a hybrid of theoretical insights into the importance of objects from a number of different fields and just beautifully told stories about particular things. Turkle’s introduction provides just enough background to let the essays speak for themselves, however her conclusion limits the turklle of the contributions by attempting to pigeonhole their meanings in ways that the collection otherwise evades.

In its space, I would have loved for Turkle herself, whose scholarship is so concerned with identity formation in a digital age, to write about her own evocative object. May 14, S. Before I start, may I say that I love the jacket on this? Beautiful snow blue evocatice on black – rich and ethereal at the same time.

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Content-wise, this collection was better than I expected. Some of the essays were evocativewhereas others failed to convey much beyond an intellectualized symbol. To evoke, for me, is onjects awaken emotion and memory a Before I start, may I say that I love the jacket on this?

To evoke, for me, is to awaken emotion and memory and the essays that failed in my eyes ignored the former. Some of the essays shfrry touch readers although the object being examined may be outside their usual haunts, like ballet slippers or the glucometer. Other objects don’t seem to leave the hands of the writers pondering them – the writer of the essay on the Objecrs camera, for example, didn’t reach out to objectz at all.

But maybe I’m just an emotional lush – the essay on the rolling pin was my favorite. Jun 04, Christine Henry rated it it was amazing.

This collection of essays about the meaning of objects is both provocative and meditative. Introduced by the Sherry Turkle, best known for her work in the digital world, these essays focus on the role that the tangible world plays in understanding our own feelings as well as evocatjve perspectives of others. Particularly poignant for me was the essay about the silver pin, obiects object that defined the author’s image of her mother. Imbued with both the pain of loss and the beauty of youth, the pin evokes This collection of essays about the meaning of objecst is both provocative and meditative.

Imbued with tugkle the pain of loss and the beauty of youth, the pin evokes stories of family history and the challenges of parent-child relationships. These essays provided me with a myriad of perspectives on how important our physical world is in understanding the cultures around us.

Though none of the objects described is inherently valuable, each of the authors shares how they have infused their own object with a meaning that is both very personal and universal.

It gave me pause to think about museums as places obkects hold tangible objects in stewardship for everyone. In museums focus has traditionally been on the meaning of the collections both to the individuals associated with the object as well the culture in which they were a part. Imagination allows people to make a personal connection to an object, which turklr continues the cultural significance of that object beyond its initial meaning.

Layers of understanding allow ownership of collections by the greater community, which objeects the objects continue to live while in protective custody of museums. Sep 16, Linda rated it it was amazing.

I love this book of evocativve for its terrific merging of science and the humanities. Turkle, an MIT prof, asked a range of mostly scientists to pen essays around an “evocative object” in their lives, something that connects in very primary ways with their lives and careers.

She links the project to Claude Levi-Strauss’s idea of bricolage thinking through objects, in brief. She then added small jewels of philosophical wisdom to each essay from Marx to Baudrillard.

One of my favorites is about a I love this book of essays for its terrific merging of science and the humanities. One of my favorites is about a yellow raincoat, a kind of protective “spacesuit” that allowed the writer to live in what too often seemed a challenging world. He went on to study the neurobiology of autism!

Evocative Objects: Things We Think with by Sherry Turkle

I used the idea for a set of student essays once. It produced wonderful results. I suggest writing your own when you’ve finished the collection. Aug 19, Jeff rated it it was amazing.

Sherry Turkle is best known for evoocative about the impact of the internet on identity. This book is an anthology of people writing about things that are important or significant to them. The range is enormous here, and many of the pieces are quite poignant. If obmects want to get a better understanding of the human relationship with “stuff” – all those products and objects that clutter and inhabit our lives – then this turklee is a wonderful way to access that.

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Each original essay is preceded by a Sherry Turkle is best known for writing about the impact of the internet on tturkle. Each original essay is preceded by a quote from a well-known writer or philosopher or theorist, and some of those are pretty swell, too.

Wherry because each essay is relatively short, the book is easy to pick up and put down, if you tend to be pressed for time to read as I sometimes am. Aug 22, Cheryl rated it it was amazing. I set this book aside, in June. This what I do when I know that I am going to love a book and want to have it hovering around just in case I need solace and something to dive in to. I picked it up a week ago. Photography, combined with memoir writing, combined with excerpts from scholarly essays: This book deepened my perspective on many objects and notions.

Feb evocxtive, Phoenix rated it really liked it Shelves: On our connections to eveyday things My own experiences echoes that of the previous reviewer David Block.

Turkle opens up an interesting subject for discussion but I was expecting a deeper analysis. The closing essay by Turkle indicates and reviews points of interest but but doesn’t satisfy. I was expecting Tyrkle to say more to tie the ideas together. The bulk of the book is a collection of essays by researchers at MIT about particular objects that they have imbued with personal meaning. Most of On our connections to eveyday things My own experiences echoes that of the previous reviewer David Block.

Most of these are quite enjoyable, the ones that stood out for me include Carole Strohecker on “Knots”, Judith Donath on her ” Ford Falcon” I was the last owner of a Ford Fairlane and can relate and Howard Gardiner on “Keyboards” I’m reading him in another book Initially I tried to read the book in a single setting, and then got bored – it was good, but not all at once. I then finished it bit by bit, sipping the experiences. I’d recommend this as a gift book for someone who is a collector or who someone like myself just likes to browse in antique and craft shops for interesting items.

I’d evocatife recommend this book for writing teachers as a jumping off point for student essays. Perhaps the best response to reading this book is to write your own personal chapter about similar objects in your own life, perhaps one that connects you to a previous generation. For example I have a scalloped bowl designed to look like a leaf of lettuce that belonged to my mother and before that my grandmother.

Its slightly chippedturklee I use it sherrry once a year in memory of them. Jan 27, Caroline rated it it was ok. This is a series of very short essays desscribing the objects very loosely defined that the authors used to negociate evocatice, family, loss, career and abilitites. The Subtitle is ‘Things to think with’ but most of ssherry authors describe their feelings, and mostly in terms that suggested that the subtle and immersive shifts of sensory memory cannot be adequately put into words.

Which might be true, but made bojects tedious and repetitive reading.